Author: Ping

Unit 5 – F2F weekend (II)

Age of Disruption Adrian Wooldridge:

  • Creative self-disruption
  • What is Disruptive Innovation?  – New market value Clayton M Christensen

GEM: Global Entrepreneur Monitoring Report

http://www.gemconsortium.org/

Entrepreneurship Disruptive Innovation:

https://www.virgin.com/disruptors/have-entrepreneurs-lost-the-will-to-innovate

 

James Franco: 72 hours of movie marathon of his own film

http://time.com/4544482/james-franco-della-robbia-video/

Shia LaBeouf: http://labeoufronkkoturner.com/

 

Ted talk: Ken Robinson: out of our minds learning to be creative

Richard Florida: the new Urban crisis

 

Daniel Goleman: https://www.ted.com/talks/daniel_goleman_on_compassion

competence: youtube.com/watch?v=Y7m9eNoB3NU

Traits: TEIQUE assessment and report

https://www.aps-360.com/teique/selfreport/login.asp

(need to pay)

Film

 

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Unit 5 – F2F Intensive Weekend

Concept of business model Canvas

Making Money v. Assumptions

  • Michael Lewis 2014. The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story
  • Peter Durker (1905-2005) “Assumptions about what a company gets paid for” Assumptions are about markets, customers and competitors, values and behaviors, technology. Assumptions are most important.
  • Business model has to be reviewed and tested constantly.
  • Clay Christensen – Disruptive Innovation
  • Joan Magretta, 2002. A good business model remains essential to every successful organization.
  • Ovans, A. 2015. HBR what is a business model
  • When business models don’t work, it’s because they fail either the narrative test or the numbers test

Global Trends impactd: Increasing inequality, political uncertianty, technology change, demographic change, globalisation, environmental sustainability, urbanisation.

Social value continue to increase: New experience economy, new mindsets, lifestyles

digital technology: create, produce, present, market, distribute

Concepts cross-fertilisation or creative spillovers, cross-sectoral innovation

Case studies:

  • Museum of ice cream
  • Making digital Work: business model
  • Project Archive – Digital RND fund for the Arts http://artsdigitalrnd.org.uk/projects
  • Mission Models Money (MMM) : a network of thinkers and doers from the UK and elsewhere, its goal was to transform the way people working with arts and culture used their resources to create great experiences which and deep public value.
  • Digital culture 2017 by Arts Council England and Nesta’s study of technology usage impact among arts and culture organisations
  • CreativeLenses: New models of performing arts organisations and venues

 

Revenue Models

http://www.thecreativeindustries.co.uk/media/32289/creative-industries-routes-to-finance.pdf

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/our-investment-2015-18/national-portfolio-organisations

Case studies:

Corporate Investment

Creative, Innovating, disrupting through Arts & Business organisation

 

 

Unit 5 – Business Model

Business canvas

Case study: CNEX

Day one vision was to preserve visuals and cultures of Chinese communities. with specific goal of making 100 documentaries in 10 years. Then it becomes a seed funding organisation and expanded to all languages. Losing the core value.

Customer segments:

  • students of the film workshop
  • patronage from private sector
  • documentary audience
  • film development funds

Limitation of CNEX: 1) not a mass brand; 2) only a few will be get the benefit; 3) only co-owning, partial stake of the fund, cannot fire director in order to keep the value of the filming.

organisations:

  • Create Hong Kong Fund
  • MaD
  • MaD good lab
  • Musiclab (KJ Wong)
  • VeryHK: Permaculture for urban farming in Mongkok
  • Youth.org

Words:

  • Long tailed – products with no shelf lives
  • Red sea (mass market) / Blue ocean (niche market)
  • Sapientia et  Virtus (Wisdom and Virtue)

documentaries:

  • <Music Life – KJ Wong>
  • <Go Grandriders>
  • <If you build it>
  • <Capital C>
  • <Headmastress of five students>

Names:

  • Romeo Brittle
  • Peter Blake
  • Karkarma: in new light for Joyce group of Lane Crawford
  • desmond hui
  • Ada Wong

 

Unit 4 Assignment and feedback

Artifact – Customised Design of Digital Prison Break Device (Website mockup)

 

Report One – Viability of the Project: Customised Design of Digital Prison Break Device

Introduction

The modern mobile technology has given us unprecedented convenience, but also presented us with a problem: we grow overly dependent on mobile phones, and they become our most intimate item that we carry everywhere. We are able to connect with anyone through the technology, but we are probably disconnecting ourselves with people next to us. The development of technology should facilitate the development of humanity not to keep us away from each other.

When people gather, mobile phones make us feel more alone, because the attention with each other is usually distracted by them. Research showed that this phenomenon contributes to an overall feeling of dissatisfaction within the relationship. Although physically close to each other, everyone seems to be locked inside an invisible prison cell.

In this paper, I come up with a venture idea that helps people break this digital prison, and re-establish the relationship with each other and re-think their relationship with technology.

Target segment and their needs

I’ll need some pioneers for this type of prison break, so I start from people who feel the pain of being locked in the digital prison and feeling their relationships are victimised. Thanks to the ubiquity of the mobile phone, it is not difficult to find these “victims”, here are a selected few:

Fiona, an unhappy wife struggles to get her husband’s attention. Either at home or out at dinner, the husband is always absent minded, distracted by every notification or text message appeared on the phone. His concentration usually gets drifted further once the phone is swiped open.

Calvin, a project manager who is frustrated from people’s constant distractions by their phones during meetings, and he hates inefficient and inconclusive discussions.

Georgia, a working mother of two boys, who complains about her boys’ obsessive indulges of their mobile games, and seeking an app to control the boys’ usage of their apps.

Cassandra, whose husband is addictive to twitter, couldn’t stop scrolling through tweets even when it’s way past bed time.

Mandy, a stay home mother of 5 years old boy. She is constantly tired and lack of sleep, not only because she takes care of a child, but also she spends her waking time hooked on social media. She realises that she has a problem and feel like a failure as a mom.

Each of these cases, the person feels that their family bonding or people connections being taken away. They feel helpless and desperately need to gain back control of the time, attention and relationship.

Insights and gaps identified

There is a common job to be done in all these stories: Create a boundary between digital life and real life. This will help people break free physically and emotionally. Firstly, digital devices need to be

put away at a designated plan. Secondly, only when you create a clear boundary then you can start free the mind. We simply cannot use another mobile APP to cure the addiction to mobile phones.

I asked people further where their family members charge their phones, the answer is wherever they feel convenient, next to Sofa in lounge or next to bed etc. Cassandra’s husband moves the charging station from living room to bed room when it’s bed time. Fiona’s husband charges phones next to the sofa, he checks his phone while watching TV.

I researched for the ways that help people to gain back control of the personal connection: Attend counselling, which usually work if the whole family is on board, not a popular choice in Hong Kong anyway; “Praya” the restaurant in Hong Kong started recently to offer discount to guests who willingly lock up their phones during their meal; One McDonald outlet in Singapore has put up mobile phone lockers that encourages both kids and parents to put their phones away, with very limited success.

The observation is that people are not yet used to the idea of a boundary, instead mobile phones have become their vulnerable weakness (imagine the panic attack when people are not with their phones), and they don’t realise the impact to the relationships, which is a threat to social health. The idea of trapped in the digital prison and the need to break free should be widely spread. And currently in Hong Kong, there is very little effort that has been done. Hence an opportunity for venture idea is born.

When developing the idea, I have gone through some iterations that are illustrated as below:

The evolvement of idea Feedback was So I thought

Initially Digital Detox Wellness Centre “I don’t want to go out of my way to be there” Need to detox at home first.

Then Home appliance for digital detox – Phridge (Phone+fridge) for rental “”mmm….. I’d like to have a timer on the locker”; “… Should be portable so can use at restaurant too” One size cannot fits all, definitely need customisation for different venues

Proto-

typing Design your own Home digital detox corner “How do you make money then? “ “Why would designers do it for free?” Design ideas for free; Student designers who are digital natives and willing to do it to grow design project portfolio “It needs to be educational”, awareness is low Ok, media and videos I don’t like read texts, “Concentrate on the apparatus and creation” of these areas Ok, tools that help the creative process. make it fun, like playing an escape game Like an escape experience, only this time it is a digital prison break!

Finally Customised Design of “Digital Prison Break device” Introduce the concept of digital prison break with one tip: set a boundary for digital devices; People are invited to make their creation of digital prison break devices; Hire young and upcoming designers help people to customise design, at home at businesses, theatres/cinemas etc.

Venture Content and Planning

The main objective is to establish the design practice of putting a boundary between people’s time together and the digital distractions starting from their own homes.

The ultimate mission is get people to rethink their relationships with technology and to be with each other together again.

Functionally, it may just be a storage or locker or consolidated charging station at a corner, it sets a physical boundary from the digital life, just like the shoe cabinet that each home has at the door way or cloak room at a theatre. Emotionally, it’s a place to put away people’s distractions, and free their minds with other enjoyment in life.

The website “digitalprisonbreak.org” is a platform to showcase people’s “prison break” devices with tools and offline email service to customise design according to individual preference; In addition, to provide educational researches and media, create a community who will start making the changes in their lives.

I realise that Hong Kong design students would love to have the opportunities to work on design ideas and accumulate their portfolio, especially with a meaningful cause. The added benefit is, these are digital natives, and their designs could potentially start a trend in younger generation.

In terms of fee, I offer clients design ideas for free, but will give a quotation individually according to the materials, time and effort. The details will be handled case by case initially.

Conclusion

This idea aims to bring difference in the society, increase the level of awareness and mindfulness of what’s more important in the relationships. As a cultural impact, I hope this venture idea changes the way people think about technology, bring people closer together, and develop better future of humanity.

– End –

(Word count: 1248)

Report Two – Reflective Writing

I attribute the evolvement of my idea to the people I talk to, especially the classmates from the ACE course.

Initially I was very fixated to set up a physical digital detox wellness centre, it all changed when I had lunch with ACE fellow classmates Cassandra and Georgia, who have told me that they have phone addiction problems at home. The minute I brought up my wellness centre idea, they said simultaneously …”No, it’s got to be at home, I wouldn’t go out of my way to be there”.

So I interviewed them further, where their family members charge phones, it seems that the phones are charged near where they spend time the most, for example, if they are in the living room, then the charging station will be there, and if they move to bed room, the charging station moves with them… that gives me the idea that what people need is to set a clear boundary. When it is not the time for appropriate use of phones, the devices should go into this designated corner. The “boundary” Idea was further validated by Georgia who said, it would just like the shoe cabinet, people are used to take off their shoes at the door and put them into the shoe cabinet, and mobile phones are just another item they need to put away before they go into the house.

Georgia also mentioned, if I set up a website, it’s got to be educational too, since there is still lack of awareness in the mass. With this as a basis, I developed my idea further to a customised design service, since it is really difficult to make one size fits all, every home has its uniqueness.

My classmate Sing teaches at Hong Kong Design Institute, I asked him that if I have a meaningful project, would the design students be willing to work on it for free, his answer is positive. It gives me the confidence of the delivery of the design for the clients in need.

In my attempt to help my classmates, I asked Vicky about her project when she only just started, a website for Art event and promotion service leveraging big data, she was not sure about the technical term for digital analytics on using big data for targeting people. I told her that my company use adobe’s Omniture for marketing optimisation and retargeting.

I liked Georgia’s online catalogue platform for art curation. I sent her the cropped image of google advanced search function page so she could improve on her catalogue search. I also told her that she could leverage this idea to help some young designers to get their works recognized by experienced curators or consultants.

Although Cassandra thought her idea was bad, but when I listened to it, it was actually great and inspiring. Her basic concept is to develop a means for art-loving people to rent an art piece at home. I mentioned to her that there is a similar business where art is crowd funded, and like stock shares, people who funded can have certain right over the art piece. Hope it helped.

– End –

(Word count: 522)

Report One – Viability of the Project: Customised Design of Digital Prison Break Device

Introduction

The modern mobile technology has given us unprecedented convenience, but also presented us with a problem: we grow overly dependent on mobile phones, and they become our most intimate item that we carry everywhere. We are able to connect with anyone through the technology, but we are probably disconnecting ourselves with people next to us. The development of technology should facilitate the development of humanity not to keep us away from each other.

When people gather, mobile phones make us feel more alone, because the attention with each other is usually distracted by them. Research showed that this phenomenon contributes to an overall feeling of dissatisfaction within the relationship. Although physically close to each other, everyone seems to be locked inside an invisible prison cell.

In this paper, I come up with a venture idea that helps people break this digital prison, and re-establish the relationship with each other and re-think their relationship with technology.

Target segment and their needs

I’ll need some pioneers for this type of prison break, so I start from people who feel the pain of being locked in the digital prison and feeling their relationships are victimised. Thanks to the ubiquity of the mobile phone, it is not difficult to find these “victims”, here are a selected few:

Fiona, an unhappy wife struggles to get her husband’s attention. Either at home or out at dinner, the husband is always absent minded, distracted by every notification or text message appeared on the phone. His concentration usually gets drifted further once the phone is swiped open.

Calvin, a project manager who is frustrated from people’s constant distractions by their phones during meetings, and he hates inefficient and inconclusive discussions.

Georgia, a working mother of two boys, who complains about her boys’ obsessive indulges of their mobile games, and seeking an app to control the boys’ usage of their apps.

Cassandra, whose husband is addictive to twitter, couldn’t stop scrolling through tweets even when it’s way past bed time.

Mandy, a stay home mother of 5 years old boy. She is constantly tired and lack of sleep, not only because she takes care of a child, but also she spends her waking time hooked on social media. She realises that she has a problem and feel like a failure as a mom.

Each of these cases, the person feels that their family bonding or people connections being taken away. They feel helpless and desperately need to gain back control of the time, attention and relationship.

Insights and gaps identified

There is a common job to be done in all these stories: Create a boundary between digital life and real life. This will help people break free physically and emotionally. Firstly, digital devices need to be

put away at a designated plan. Secondly, only when you create a clear boundary then you can start free the mind. We simply cannot use another mobile APP to cure the addiction to mobile phones.

I asked people further where their family members charge their phones, the answer is wherever they feel convenient, next to Sofa in lounge or next to bed etc. Cassandra’s husband moves the charging station from living room to bed room when it’s bed time. Fiona’s husband charges phones next to the sofa, he checks his phone while watching TV.

I researched for the ways that help people to gain back control of the personal connection: Attend counselling, which usually work if the whole family is on board, not a popular choice in Hong Kong anyway; “Praya” the restaurant in Hong Kong started recently to offer discount to guests who willingly lock up their phones during their meal; One McDonald outlet in Singapore has put up mobile phone lockers that encourages both kids and parents to put their phones away, with very limited success.

The observation is that people are not yet used to the idea of a boundary, instead mobile phones have become their vulnerable weakness (imagine the panic attack when people are not with their phones), and they don’t realise the impact to the relationships, which is a threat to social health. The idea of trapped in the digital prison and the need to break free should be widely spread. And currently in Hong Kong, there is very little effort that has been done. Hence an opportunity for venture idea is born.

When developing the idea, I have gone through some iterations that are illustrated as below:

The evolvement of idea Feedback was So I thought

Initially Digital Detox Wellness Centre “I don’t want to go out of my way to be there” Need to detox at home first.

Then Home appliance for digital detox – Phridge (Phone+fridge) for rental “”mmm….. I’d like to have a timer on the locker”; “… Should be portable so can use at restaurant too” One size cannot fits all, definitely need customisation for different venues

Proto-

typing Design your own Home digital detox corner “How do you make money then? “ “Why would designers do it for free?” Design ideas for free; Student designers who are digital natives and willing to do it to grow design project portfolio “It needs to be educational”, awareness is low Ok, media and videos I don’t like read texts, “Concentrate on the apparatus and creation” of these areas Ok, tools that help the creative process. make it fun, like playing an escape game Like an escape experience, only this time it is a digital prison break!

Finally Customised Design of “Digital Prison Break device” Introduce the concept of digital prison break with one tip: set a boundary for digital devices; People are invited to make their creation of digital prison break devices; Hire young and upcoming designers help people to customise design, at home at businesses, theatres/cinemas etc.

Venture Content and Planning

The main objective is to establish the design practice of putting a boundary between people’s time together and the digital distractions starting from their own homes.

The ultimate mission is get people to rethink their relationships with technology and to be with each other together again.

Functionally, it may just be a storage or locker or consolidated charging station at a corner, it sets a physical boundary from the digital life, just like the shoe cabinet that each home has at the door way or cloak room at a theatre. Emotionally, it’s a place to put away people’s distractions, and free their minds with other enjoyment in life.

The website “digitalprisonbreak.org” is a platform to showcase people’s “prison break” devices with tools and offline email service to customise design according to individual preference; In addition, to provide educational researches and media, create a community who will start making the changes in their lives.

I realise that Hong Kong design students would love to have the opportunities to work on design ideas and accumulate their portfolio, especially with a meaningful cause. The added benefit is, these are digital natives, and their designs could potentially start a trend in younger generation.

In terms of fee, I offer clients design ideas for free, but will give a quotation individually according to the materials, time and effort. The details will be handled case by case initially.

Conclusion

This idea aims to bring difference in the society, increase the level of awareness and mindfulness of what’s more important in the relationships. As a cultural impact, I hope this venture idea changes the way people think about technology, bring people closer together, and develop better future of humanity.

– End –

(Word count: 1248)

Report Two – Reflective Writing

I attribute the evolvement of my idea to the people I talk to, especially the classmates from the ACE course.

Initially I was very fixated to set up a physical digital detox wellness centre, it all changed when I had lunch with ACE fellow classmates Cassandra and Georgia, who have told me that they have phone addiction problems at home. The minute I brought up my wellness centre idea, they said simultaneously …”No, it’s got to be at home, I wouldn’t go out of my way to be there”.

So I interviewed them further, where their family members charge phones, it seems that the phones are charged near where they spend time the most, for example, if they are in the living room, then the charging station will be there, and if they move to bed room, the charging station moves with them… that gives me the idea that what people need is to set a clear boundary. When it is not the time for appropriate use of phones, the devices should go into this designated corner. The “boundary” Idea was further validated by Georgia who said, it would just like the shoe cabinet, people are used to take off their shoes at the door and put them into the shoe cabinet, and mobile phones are just another item they need to put away before they go into the house.

Georgia also mentioned, if I set up a website, it’s got to be educational too, since there is still lack of awareness in the mass. With this as a basis, I developed my idea further to a customised design service, since it is really difficult to make one size fits all, every home has its uniqueness.

My classmate Sing teaches at Hong Kong Design Institute, I asked him that if I have a meaningful project, would the design students be willing to work on it for free, his answer is positive. It gives me the confidence of the delivery of the design for the clients in need.

In my attempt to help my classmates, I asked Vicky about her project when she only just started, a website for Art event and promotion service leveraging big data, she was not sure about the technical term for digital analytics on using big data for targeting people. I told her that my company use adobe’s Omniture for marketing optimisation and retargeting.

I liked Georgia’s online catalogue platform for art curation. I sent her the cropped image of google advanced search function page so she could improve on her catalogue search. I also told her that she could leverage this idea to help some young designers to get their works recognized by experienced curators or consultants.

Although Cassandra thought her idea was bad, but when I listened to it, it was actually great and inspiring. Her basic concept is to develop a means for art-loving people to rent an art piece at home. I mentioned to her that there is a similar business where art is crowd funded, and like stock shares, people who funded can have certain right over the art piece. Hope it helped.

– End –

(Word count: 522)

Unit 4 – Art Entrepreneureship

Customer discovery: MVS – Minimum Viable Segment

Things to start thinking of:

What is the “Doing Culture” in a specific location. (Case study: Korea Homeplus, wants to be number one and beat e-mark, they revamped the shop front into mobile presence)

who are prototype customers, MVS, and develop empathy map. Research of the prototype customers, make sense of the answers from them, and come up with a story by re-organize the thoughts anew and present the customers’s saying into a story

Needs —> wants (stronger needs) —> demands (wants + buying ability)

Case studies from previous term: 1) dental space design, research of doctors and patience to reduce the intensity of the atmosphere. 2) Cultural courses for HK’s domestic helpers, bring communities close and create harmony and respect

 

 

 

 

Unit 3 Assignment (Part II)

Unsuccessful Case Study: “Stop Phubbing” Movement

 

With the mobile phone, we are at the centre of post-modernity. The mobile phone embodies many parallel and contradictory dimensions of meaning: utilitarian use with leisure, the facilitation of everyday life versus dependency, freedom and control, richness of interaction or introversion, private practices and public use, social cohesion with separation.

(Kopomaa, 2002)

Introduction

Mobile phone has become an indispensable part of everyone’s every day, we can either use to facilitate our daily life or develop dependency. It unprecedentedly connects us to the world, also gives us constant “fear of missing out”, irresistible urge of swipe-opening of the smart phone. It changes our social practices, as commonly seen a in cafes and restaurants, people looking down at their mobile devices but ignoring friends or families who are at the same table. Is it possible that we are expecting more from technology and less from each other (Turkle, 2012)? When people gather for social events, mobile phone make us feel more alone, research showed this contributes to an overall feeling of dissatisfaction within the relationship. (Chang, 2015)

In this paper, I introduce a movement that tried to raise awareness of the concerns in 2012 with the slogan “Stop Phubbing”. The campaign did not get the effect one would have hoped for. But I hope that by taking a deeper look of this case study, we can justify why it is challenging.

The “Stop Phubbing” Movement

In 2012, a Sydney University student started with the idea, and with the help from an advertising agency (Mccann) and sponsored by Macquarie dictionary of Australia, a group of experts created the word “Phubbing”, a portmanteau of ‘Phone” and “Snubbing”, in order to make the movement legitimated and easily adopted by people (Pathak, 2013), and it was also captured by the Macquarie dictionary of Australia (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSOfuUYCV_0&t=6s , 2013):

Phubbing (v) ‘The act of snubbing someone in a social setting by looking at your phone instead of paying attention.

Its website www.stopphubbing.com polls people’s standpoints on either “I’m ALL FOR PHUBBING” or “I’m TOTALLY AGAINST PHUBBING”. The result shows 71% out of 156,769 total votes are FOR PHUBBING, completely different from the 2013 result: 72% out of the 4,622 total votes were AGAINST PHUBBING….

Below images show the difference in opinion polled (www.stopphubbing.com)
(2013)

2017

To this date, the “Phubbing” phenomenon is still widely seen. Neither the word nor the movement has made its impact.

Globalisation and Communications – Impact on social relations and interactions

“Time and space compression” (Harvey, 1990) is an adequate description of globalisation. We are technically and socially connected through social medias, instant messages all the time, one’s perception about space is evolving – we simultaneously locate in one place physically and connect to those situated other places via mobile phone. But somehow, the personal face to face bonding seem to be distanciated.

Mobile phone has often borne the brunt of fears and anxieties around contemporary notions of belonging, dislocation, mobility and defining a sense of place and home. This resonates with Arjun Appadurai’s model of globalisation, locality and region are not fixed geographic boundaries, but rather, mutating and ever-evolving scapes in the disjunctive flows of global objects, media and people. In this case, the disjuncture of the technoscape and mediascape influence culture by enabling technological co-presence, enables the extension of individual identity. (Appadurai, 1996)

Intimacy also has a paradigm shift, mobile phone becomes the most intimate device that accompanies us everywhere (Fortunati 2002), reading of the mobile phone has become a symbol of intimacy and co-presence. (Hjorth, 2008) This explains why “phubbing” can make other people feeling left alone.

Leaving the mobile device, we feel very inadequate in human to human conversations. This has been recognized globally and some responses from artists like Tino Sehgal, whose exhibition “These Associations” almost tested human solidarity. (These Associations, “Uniliver Series”, 2012)

Modern theories are all pointing to an irreversible trend of the ubiquitous presence of mobile device and the irresistible urge of being connected at all times. On the other hand, to have a healthy living means to overcome the increasing tendency for addiction, we do not want to comprise the normal relationship and social etiquettes, which essentially makes us human.

Analysis – Why the “Stop Phubbing” movement is not successful

The success of an activism movement needs to have a scale of reach, awareness that leads to the changes of people’s mind and behaviours.

Its Youtube video on “Phubbing” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSOfuUYCV_0&t=6s 2013) have 170,000 YouTube views up to date, but impact was minimum, and when its own website shows the contrary message that 71% of the voters are supporting “phubbing”, this calls for a definite failure.

I question firstly the naming of ‘Phubbing’. It’s not intuitive. I have interviewed around 20 people from different ages, nobody can give me an immediate response. It is difficult to grasp the meaning. Instead of inviting language experts, turning to the netizens for ideation may create better awareness.

Secondly, can ‘Phubbing’ really be stopped? It will get more and more challenging since mobile phone practices can be viewed as an extension of the users’ identity and lifestyle, they are viewed as socio-cultural rituals of the everyday (Hjorth, 2008). People’s need of ‘Phubbing” will only get stronger with the advance of mobile technology.

The hardest part is to overcome the addictive habit and resist the urge. There have been some gentle nudges hoping for minor adjustments to people’s behaviour: Signs in some restaurants “We don’t have wifi, talk to each other”, social organisation started projects like “Your Mobile Phone needs a Rest” (http://www.jcihk.org/en/event_detail.php?id=551) are merely moving the tip of the iceberg.

The involvement of authoritative government body with strong research findings can alert and guide people. In Hong Kong, the Department of Health has found that the median age of toddlers to use a smartphone for the first time was at the age of one, mobile devices are used as ‘e-pacifiers’. (SCMP, 2017). If we don’t change now, how is it possible to ask this generation and their future children to refrain from using electronic devices?!

Conclusion

We easily adapt to the advantage of the technology globalisation. But we do not want to let technology make us think less of humanity. The technoscape influences manifest through social media, which connects people virtually together, even when promoting the less use of mobile phones, we still need to leverage mobile social practice. Whether or not we can stop the “Phubbing” phenomenon, efforts need to be made now especially with the digital natives becoming the leading force of the world, keeping the heritage of conversation can be more challenging but more urgent than ever.

  • End   –

(Word Count: 1103)

 

Reference.

Kopomaa, T. (2002) ‘The reunited family of the media information society’, Receiver, 6, http://www.receiver.vodafone.com (Accessed 7 August 2017).

 

Turkle, S., 2012. Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. Basic books.

 

Chang, L. (2015) “What is Phubbing, and is it ruining your relationships?” Available at: https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/what-is-phubbing-and-is-it-ruining-your-relationships/

(Accessed: 7 August 2017).

 

Pathak S. (2013) “Mccann Melbourne Made Up a Word to Sell a Print Dictionary”. Available at:

http://adage.com/article/news/mccann-melbourne-made-a-word-sell-a-dictionary/244595/ (Accessed 7 August 2017)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSOfuUYCV_0&t=6s , 2013 (Accessed: 7 August 2017)

David, H., 1989. The condition of postmodernity: an enquiry into the origins of cultural change.

Appadurai, A (1996). Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalisation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press

Fortunati, L., 2002. The mobile phone: Towards new categories and social relations. Information, communication & society5(4), pp.513-528.

Hjorth, L., 2008. Mobile media in the Asia-Pacific: Gender and the art of being mobile. Routledge.

These Associations (2012) “Uniliver Series”, Tate Modern, London. 24 July – 28 October 2012

SCMP, 2017 “Screen time on rise as Hong Kong toddlers given electronic devices as ‘e-pacifiers’ from before age of one), 3 August, available at http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/health-environment/article/2105329/screen-time-rise-hong-kong-toddlers-given (Accessed: 7 August 2017)

http://www.jcihk.org/en/event_detail.php?id=551 , Accessed 7 August 2017

Unit 3 Assignment Submission (Part I)

Successful Case: “Hello World”, a TED Talk Inspired Project

Introduction

The globalisation of advanced technology facilitates the “expanding scale, growing magnitude, speeding up and deepening impact of transcontinental flows” (McGrew, 2002). Because of this, the way we educate and learn has gone through a dramatic change. For example, people who have access to the Internet can seek education from the Massive Open Online Course (http://mooc.org, 2016). But there are still isolated areas in the world that people has no access to the Internet yet.

How can education make humanity more intelligent, knowledgeable, and wise enough to address its global challenges?  (http://www.millennium-project.org/millennium/challeng.html, 2014). This asks us to spread innovative ideas and provide means of education for those underprivileged.

TED talks in the form of Internet is a technology globalisation, its core value of creating free access to people for “ideas worth spreading” has inspired many people. And one of the ideas for solving the educational deficit was mentioned in educator Sugata Mitra’s TED talk in 2013 (https://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_build_a_school_in_the_cloud).

In this paper, I introduce a project inspired by this TED talk called “Hello World”. I believe that it sets a good example of how to collaborate and solve the global challenge, and in the same time demonstrate how big an impact that the “ideas worth spreading” can make.

 

Description of Project “Hello World” Inspired by TED

TED is the abbreviation of “Technology, Entertainment and Design”, it is a non-profit organisation that spread innovative ideas by inviting people to give short and powerful talks and then publish on the Internet for wider reach. (www.ted.com)

During the 2013 TED talk, Sugata Mitra explained his ingenious idea that children have an innate desire to learn and can make enormous steps forward if they are given the opportunity to teach themselves based on his experiment “Hole in the Wall” in which computer stations were put into slums in India and made freely accessible. Those stations gave underprivileged children and adults the opportunity to explore, learn, teach each other, and collaborate in solving problems. He believes that the key to future of learning is accessibility. And then he asked the audience: “help me build schools in a cloud”.

Among the two and a half million audience who watched his talk were Katrina and Roland, founders of a human rights non-profit organisation. Inspired by Mitra’s preach and their shared ethos, Katrina and Roland started project “Hello World”: build solar powered computer kiosks that are WiFi-enabled for the isolated and vulnerable community members in Africa, and provide online access and through the use of preloaded education software, users can explore the world’s body of knowledge, guided by their natural curiosity and desire to learn. (https://projecthelloworld.org)

 

Globalisation of Ideas and Resolution of Scarcity

A key influence to globalisation is the “technoscape” that crosses boundaries and flows information (Appadurai, 1996). It may appear to be a coincidence, if Katrina and Roland didn’t attend the 2013 TED talk, this project may not get started. But with the expanded scales of reach powered by technology, ie. TED’s free access on Internet, the chance for such collaboration is prominent.

Innovative ideas are the fuel to economic growth, accelerator for the technology development. We can argue that these ideas are precious, the right to the ideas need to be preserved to make money, or we can find a way to spread the good ideas so everyone has the chance to get inspired.

Like the constant struggle with scarcity in resources and Intellectual properties, some are due to accessibility, and some are purposely designed to benefit big corporations (Goodbun, Klein, Rumpfhuber, Till, 2015). TED designed a platform to publish them with free access. It “reconstructed values and knowledge of the world, reforming the ways we know reality” (Kagan, 2012, 15), it is indeed revolutionary in cultural and sustainability. The ideas TED spread have opened up people’s mind, bring people with same interest, value and ethos together, and empower global collaborations.

In this case, bring Sugata’s idea to the actual formation of the “Hello World” project. By giving them access to solar powered computers, the scarcity of “text book, classrooms and teachers” can be transformed into opening up access to a virtual source of knowledge, the curiosity of kids can drive them to learn like every other child in the planet.

Why Project “Hello World” inspired by TED is a success

This TED inspired project “Hello World” is successful in different levels: built on TED’s success of idea pioneering and audience reach, has a mission to do good to the society, made a major step forward on education theory and provided a real solution to a real challenge.

The success of TED fundamentally gives the right context to the success of its inspired projects. As a symbol of technological globalisation, TED invites credible scientists, scholars, experts to give power talk, so the audience may spread further or act upon the ideas that can make differences in the world.

The implementation of the project “Hello World”, addresses the need to make quality education accessible to children and adults in disadvantaged countries and communities. This project brings learning and access to the world’s body of knowledge to children who would otherwise be denied a future, by empowering the children, it provides long term good of society at large. (https://projecthelloworld.org/)

Since 2013, the solar powered computers built by “Project Hello World” have been used by over 4,000 community members in Subsaharan Africa. No matter big or small this number is, it gives people hope. In an increasingly turbulent world, it aims to end disenfranchisement, the awareness of the positive change this can bring, this project has already made a significant achievement.

Conclusion

We have many challenges to face in this highly globalised world, as we all realised by now, no matter what we identify ourselves, we are going to rely on each other’s ideas and help to build a sustainable future together. The world is not lack of brilliant ideas, they just need to be spread. TED has done a very important step to make this happen.

Education has deficit only because it is unequally distributed: we have enough teachers, classrooms, materials in the world, but not in those isolated areas. Sugata and project “Hello World” found an alternative way to provide children with education.

From a technological globalisation perspectives, I, as many other people, have enjoyed the free access of information, and I hope to see people from all around the world can enjoy the same, facilitated by the likes of “Hello World” project, turning ideas into the great power of humanity.

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Reference:

Held, D. and McGrew, A., 2007. Globalization/anti-globalization: Beyond the great divide. P.1., Polity.

http://mooc.org, 2016, Accessed: 8 August 2017

http://www.millennium-project.org/millennium/challeng.html, accessed: 9 August 2017

https://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_build_a_school_in_the_cloud, accessed: 9 August 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uf7iFIxUwDk , accessed: 9 August 2017

https://projecthelloworld.org/ accessed: 9 August 2017

Appadurai, A (1996). Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalisation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press

Goodbun, J, Klein M., Rumpfhuber, A., Till, J, 2015, The Design of Scarcity, Strelka Press

Kagan, S., 2012. Toward global (environ) mental change: Transformative art and cultures of sustainability. Heinrich Böll Foundation.